UPDATE: Trump supporters show up to student anti-Trump rally

Story by Caroline Roffe, Jamie Altman, Rebeccah Glaser and Jackie Cohen

This post contains expletive words and written signs.

At least 150 students gathered in the Attallah Piazza and then in front of Argyros Forum Wednesday afternoon to rally against Republican Donald Trump, who was elected president of the U.S. Tuesday night.

The protest began in the Attallah Piazza, where students stood silently holding signs that read “#ChapmanAgainstTrump,” “We are not defined by hate” and “He is not my president.” Some students were crying and hugging each other.

Students throw Donald Trump campaign signs from the fourth floor of Beckman Hall during an anti-Trump rally. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Donald Trump supporters throw Trump campaign signs from the fourth floor of Beckman Hall during an anti-Trump rally. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Later in the day, the rally gained momentum in front of Beckman Hall, and Trump supporters threw Trump campaign signs from the fourth floor of the building.

“This rally is a good way for us to come together as a community and grieve for a better a future that we had presented to us, where universal health care was a reality, where our president cares about minorities. We were so close to that future,” said Maggie Mirrione, a junior film production major.

Junior Brad West, president of Chapman Democrats, and junior film production major Kiersten Vannest planned the event together late Tuesday night.

“It seemed pretty clear that (Trump) was going to win, and we said, ‘OK, this has to happen right now,’” West said. “I had about 20 people in my apartment last night making signs until 3 a.m. … It grew beyond my wildest expectations.”

Students cheered when others brought out the rainbow flag in support of the LGBTQIA+ community. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Students cheered when others brought out the rainbow flag in support of the LGBTQIA+ community. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Vannest said that she hoped the rally would send a message of empathy and show students who felt marginalized by the election that their voices are still being heard.

“The fact that this many people showed up, shows exactly how many people needed an outlet in this time of need,” she said. “We’re here to show love, not hate. We’re a college, so we’re about education, not isolation.”

At around 1 p.m., students marched to the Orange Plaza, carrying signs and chanting, “Black Lives Matter,” “Not my president,” “(Expletive) Trump” and “Love, not fear.”

“We made a statement even beyond this campus,” West said. “We made a statement to (Orange), and that city usually sees us as just a piggy bank. We voiced our concerns, we voiced our opinion on the matter, and I think that’s important.”

Some students who had voted for Trump were in attendance and started shouting in support of him. In response, those in the rally chanted, “Rise above.”

Although the rally was only supposed to last until 2 p.m., students lingered and ended up congregating in front of Beckman Hall, where more students engaged in discussions about the election.

“I just want to stand by my candidate, well the future president now. Before it was all just a one-sided thing and I wanted people to hear both sides,” said Daniel Cooper, a freshman business administration major, who was holding a Trump campaign sign.

Cameron Gelinas, president of the Chapman Republicans, saw the rally going on and decided to bring Trump campaign signs from his car, which he later threw from Beckman Hall.

“I probably got a little carried away there,” Gelinas said. “It was more of an emotional decision, which I feel like is a very liberal thing, to be making a lot of emotional decisions. We were yelling ‘Lock her up.’ I do think that Hillary (Clinton) is a criminal. But throwing the signs off (of Beckman Hall) was probably a bad idea.”

Students engaged in a heated argument about political policies. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Students engaged in a heated argument about political policies. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Seeing the crowd, Trump supporters approached the protesters. The discussion became heated when students on both sides shouted about their views on immigration. This dissipated into dialogue between Trump and Clinton supporters over different issues.

Genevieve Geller, a freshman graphic design major, felt empowered participating in the rally and voicing her opinions.

“For me, a lot of this is being ashamed to be an American and being part of a society that would elect someone who is so hateful and so ignorant, and wanting to be part of a movement that can make our voice heard, so people know that not everyone in America believes in the hatred and the ignorance,” Geller said.

Justice Crudup, a senior political science major, attended the rally to show other students who feel marginalized that they are not alone.

“Being that I feel the same, I wanted to create a group of people that can come together today and show not only the campus but other campuses around California that we feel the same way,” Crudup said. “We are going through the same type of grieving process.”

Junior film production major Kiersten Vannest, who helped organize the rally, chanted in opposition to Donald Trump. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Junior film production major Kiersten Vannest, who helped organize the rally, chanted in opposition to Donald Trump. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Students supported Donald Trump at the rally Wednesday afternoon. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Some students supported Donald Trump at the rally Wednesday afternoon. Photo by Jackie Cohen

William Ochoa (left to right), a junior mathematics major, Alana Williams, a junior news and documentary major, Kiersten Vannest, a junior film production major, and Olivia Duchamp, a junior creative writing major hold up signs of protest against Trump's presidency in front of Leatherby Libraries in the Piazza. Photo by Caitie Guttry

William Ochoa (left to right), a junior mathematics major, Alana Williams, a junior news and documentary major, Kiersten Vannest, a junior film production major, and Olivia Duchamp, a junior creative writing major hold up signs of protest against Trump’s presidency in front of Leatherby Libraries in the Piazza. Photo by Caitie Guttry

Justice Crudup, a senior political science major, expressed his feelings about Trump being elected president. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Justice Crudup, a senior political science major, expressed his feelings about Trump being elected president. Photo by Jackie Cohen

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Students were encouraged to hug each other and appreciate their loved ones. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Students marched from Argyros Forum, to the Orange Plaza and then back. Photo by Jackie Cohen

Students marched from Argyros Forum, to the Orange Plaza and then back. Photo by Jackie Cohen

4 Comments

  • The country has spoken and they have rejected Hillary, one of the most corrupt politicians to run for president.

  • I am a Chapman Alum and I am so ashamed at the current student body. This is not the way. If you really want to make a difference, BE the difference.

    You accuse Donald Trump about saying mean things, so why are you contributing to the name calling?

    You accuse Donald Trump about disrespecting others, so why are you disrespecting his supporters?

    You accuse Donald Trump of spreading hate, but where is your love?

    So we didn’t get the candidate we wanted. We can still be Americans and he can still be “our president” whether we agree with him or not. Be active, but not destructive! C’mon my Chapman family. Let’s be the change we want to see instead of the idiots we hate to be around.

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