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Coffee consumption at Chapman

Story by Alexis Allen, Sheila Balaji, Emma Eastman and Thomas Hecker

Iced chai tea latte in front of on-campus Starbucks. Photo by Emma Eastman

The Starbucks inside Beckman Hall is bustling. There are students in line and students waiting for their drinks by the sugar and cream. The baristas are calling out various names and drinks. Lattes, mochas, refreshers and teas are yelled out into the crowd. As people wait for a caramel frappuccino, their minds wander. Ever wonder what the most popular drink is, how coffee affects people and what the caffeine alternatives are? Read below to find out more about Chapman students and their relationship with coffee.

 

 

 

 

Chapman drinks

An online and physical survey was administered to 214 students from April 3 to April 6. They answered questions such as major, school and coffee consumption per week.

Coffee consumption can vary by school at Chapman.

Coffee consumption can vary by year at Chapman.

After conducting a survey to Chapman students about coffee consumption, the top four reasons and healthy alternatives are shown.

And the award for Chapman’s favorite drink goes to…

The cafe latte! According to the survey, the most popular drink among Chapman students was the latte, at 38 percent. Here is a video of Chapman students blindly trying lattes from places in and around campus.

Not all Chapman students get their caffeine from coffee

Joe Hansen, a sophomore screenwriting major, drinks a Pike Place Starbucks coffee while studying. Photo by Emma Eastman

The answer to that is no, not all of them. Some students do get their caffeine from coffee, but others aren’t drinking it to catch that buzz.

While sophomore screen acting major Justine Winans enjoys the energy boost, she also appreciates other aspects of the beverage as well.

“I just love the taste of it, and the smell even more,” Winans wrote in an email. “The caffeine is a bonus.”

Some students don’t like coffee at all and prefer tea. Brandon Garnsey, a freshman news and documentary major, prefers passion fruit ice tea.

“I had a terrible experience with coffee,” Garnsey said, as coffee caused him to lose sleep and made him sick. “And it just feels better to drink tea.”

 

Then there are some students who drink both coffee and tea for different reasons.

“I drink tea because I can drink (it) whether at morning or at night,” said freshman public relations and advertising major Christina Yannello. “With coffee, I usually drink it in the morning or afternoon just when I need a pick-me-up.”

The effects of coffee and caffeine

Steaming black Pike Place coffee Photo by Emma Eastman

People have their ways for staying healthy: exercising, cutting out sugar, only drinking black coffee or not drinking coffee at all.

“There is insufficient evidence for promoting or discouraging coffee consumption on the daily diet.” wrote Aimee S. Tolley. Tolley is the author of the ebook “Caffeine: Consumption, Side Effects and Impact on Performance and Mood.” Tolley wrote that the effect that caffeine has on a person’s health depends on a variety of characteristics, including genetics, age and medications.

“Due to the large intersubject variability, the same dose of caffeine can cause adverse reactions in a person and have good tolerability in another one,” Tolley wrote. Basically, caffeine is naturally occurring in a variety of plants. Like any substance, it doesn’t affect the same people in the same way. It may be just fine for one person while it can give another nothing but nausea.

However, Tolley did suggest keeping it to 500 mg of caffeine a day for most adults.

People have their ways for staying healthy: exercising, cutting out sugar, only drinking black coffee or not drinking coffee at all.

“There is insufficient evidence for promoting or discouraging coffee consumption on the daily diet,” wrote Aimee S. Tolley. Tolley is the author of the ebook “Caffeine: Consumption, Side Effects and Impact on Performance and Mood.” Tolley wrote that the effect that caffeine has on a person’s health depends on a variety of characteristics, including genetics, age and medications.

“Due to the large intersubject variability, the same dose of caffeine can cause adverse reactions in a person and have good tolerability in another one,” Tolley wrote. Basically, caffeine is naturally occurring in a variety of plants. Like any substance, it doesn’t affect the same people in the same way. It may be just fine for one person while it can give another nothing but nausea.

However, Tolley did suggest keeping it to 500 mg of caffeine a day for most adults.

Alternatives to coffee

A Monster energy drink Photo by Emma Eastman

Of course, not everyone enjoys drinking coffee, and, there are other ways to get that caffeine and energy. To put it in perspective, one cup of regular instant coffee has 31 mg of caffeine per teaspoon, according to the United States Department of Agriculture database.

  1. Black tea – 11 mg of caffeine (1 value per 100g)
  2. Green tea – 12 mg of caffeine (1 value per 100g)
  3. Carbonated Coca-Cola – 9 mg of caffeine (1 value per 100g)
  4. Red Bull – 29 mg of caffeine (1 value per 100g)
  5. Cocoa powder – 18 mg (1 value per 100g)

(Source: USDA database; each measurement is equal to one serving)

These are only a few alternatives to coffee. For more options, check the USDA database linked above or read the nutrition facts on beverages.
“Forty percent of 18- to 24-year-olds, the ages in which students typically attend college, drink coffee every day.” wrote Nicole L. Olsen, graduate business administration major, in her senior honors thesis Caffeine Consumption Habits and Perceptions among University of New Hampshire Students, a study on the coffee and caffeine habits of students at the University of New Hampshire.

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