Twins transfer, lead men’s soccer team

Chapman’s men’s soccer team is giving opponents a potent dose of double vision this season.Junior forwards and twin brothers Dean and Alex Sewitz have propelled the Panthers to a 7-2 start, the team’s best since 1995, according to Sports Information Director, Doug Aiken.

Chapman’s men’s soccer team is giving opponents a potent dose of double vision this season.Junior forwards and twin brothers Dean and Alex Sewitz have propelled the Panthers to a 7-2 start, the team’s best since 1995, according to Sports Information Director, Doug Aiken. They definitely bring some extra chemistry. They know where one another is on the field a little more than anyone else,” said junior captain Jeff Shah.Though they are fraternal twins, it can be tough to tell the two apart.At 5 feet 11 inches tall, Dean Sewitz is one inch taller than Alex Sewitz, but Alex Sewitz quickly pointed out that he is one minute older.Both sport buzz cuts and diamond stud earrings and share a chiding sense of humor.”Dean is a little more compromising, whereas Alex sometimes pushes the envelope a little bit. But they are definitely maturing,” said Head Coach Eddie Carrillo.It’s all business on the field, though.Dean Sewitz’s three goals tie him with the team’s lead scorer, and his seven points, or assists and goals combined, rank second among the Panthers. Though Alex Sewitz hasn’t scored this year, he led the team in goals last season with six.”I may not have scored a goal this year, but I’m a much happier person now because we’re winning games, and last year we weren’t,” said Alex Sewitz.The twins began playing soccer at age five. Though they played baseball and basketball growing up in Tarzana, Calif., near Los Angeles, they focused their attention on soccer in high school.”Not only did we love soccer, but it was also the sport we were best at. Basically, we knew that soccer was the sport we could go farthest in so we concentrated on it,” said Dean Sewitz.Their dedication paid off.Dean Sewitz was awarded an NCAA Division I soccer scholarship to his father’s alma matter, Philadelphia University. Alex received an offer to play for San Francisco State University.But for these self-proclaimed “SoCal” kids, the cloudy skies and cold weather were too much to bear.”There was always a cloud over my head in San Francisco,” said Alex Sewitz.”On top of that, I didn’t have a car, I didn’t know anyone, and I was sitting out my freshman year. I just didn’t see a bright future there,” he said.The Panthers recruited Alex Sewitz in high school, and he called Carrillo to ask about playing for Chapman after his first semester in San Francisco. Carrillo did not guarantee him playing time, but he told Alex Sewitz that he would make the roster.He decided to take his chances in Orange and transferred to Chapman the spring of his freshman year.”Alex just came here and worked hard and played well. He earned it,” said Carrillo.Dean Sewitz, also backed by a guaranteed spot on the team, followed suit 2 1/2 years later. This fall is his first semester at Chapman.”I hated the cold weather, and our team in Philadelphia wasn’t doing too well. I also wanted to move close to home so my parents could see me play out my career,” said Dean Sewitz. “Dean has an eye for the goal and his experience helps him read situations well. He’s also a great locker room presence and he has helped us build team chemistry,” said Shah.Although the twins are of senior standing academically, they hold junior standing as athletes since they were red-shirted, meaning they practiced with the team but didn’t play their freshman year.The duo will return to the team next season, when the team is expected to lose one starter.”We are starting to beat all of the teams that crushed us the past two years. This year, we got some better athletes, got in better shape, and made some minor coaching changes that certainly didn’t hurt things,” said Alex Sewitz.However, when things do go awry, Dean and Alex Sewitz are often caught arguing with one another, said senior captain Josh Boland.”They can be a little bit hard on each other. One always lets the other know if he’s struggling, but it’s always constructive criticism,” said Boland.On the contrary, if one brother outperforms the other, they decide to harness their sentiments.”We’ll never concede that one of us is better, even if we know it,” said Alex Sewitz.

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